Noel Jenkins

Noel Jenkins is the owner of Digital Geography. He teachers in Somerset, UK.

Sep 072014
 

During the summer holidays I had some contact from Bob Harvey about the Geograph project.  Back in 2005, I really saw the value of the whole idea, but then along came Google Street View. Bob’s message inspired me to revisit the site and add some photographs that I’ve taken in the intervening years since I first joined. Most of my contributions are of locations that a Google camera will never get to see…


photo credit

As term time approached, I started to thinking about some ways that I could try and incorporate Geograph images into more lessons. Here’s a list of some ideas:

1) Teaching copyright issues

2) Lessons on landscapes – based on the ideas of Alan Parkinson and this resource from the Tate and resulting in work like this. One of the learning tasks in my SoW gets students to imagine a recipe for the British landscape and this could be suitably illustrated with a Geograph photo.

3) Overlaying map symbols directly onto Geograph photos in PPT (I need a copy of the OS symbols as individual png files with transparent backgrounds. If anyone has done this already, let me know!)

4) Recognising urban zones / different kinds of land use and general photo annotation practice.

5) Imagining the Geograph view using sketches (as it might have looked in the past / the future)

6) Drawing a sketch map based on solely on the view in a Geograph photo.

For my new Year 8 groups I decided to just rip the entire Geograph idea off and create a mini version for the local area. The idea is to get students to think about how to describe places using geographical terminology and link features with maps. They will use their phones to take an image from the local area. This will be uploaded using a form (Jot Form is perfect for this) and they will add location information using Digimaps. Finally they will describe the features of their photograph and the project will hopefully result in a nice piece of display work. Who knows, some might even contribute their work to the Geograph site!

Here’s the outline of the lesson:

May 172014
 
Real geography has real purpose, real audience and real outcomes

Chris Durbin (Early geography mentor)

Every year I try to add a twist to the Year 8 local enquiry; previously we’ve identified happy places, told geo-located stories and subverted town planning. This year I focussed on the former Fox Brothers Mill at Tonedale. It’s a very imposing listed mill building and one of the most important examples of its kind in the country.

Tonedale Mill Spinning Block 2014

DSC_9153
Tonedale Mill has given me a lot of pleasure over the years in a semi-unauthorized sort of way while it awaits conversion into residential use. I’ve written and spoken quite extensively on various ways of incorporating dereliction into local fieldwork and this wasn’t the first time that I’ve based a study on the redevelopment of the site. Unfortunately, at some point, the enthusiasm of students usually tended to supplant economic reality and theme parks and shopping malls come to dominate their regeneration agenda.

“A Millers Tale” May 2010

Millers-Tale

This year I wanted the students to engage with a real audience in the hope that the outcomes would be a little more feasible. While mulling ideas over, I happened to find myself at the Quay Climbing centre in Exeter, and cheekily suggested to owner Paul Russell that he might like to listen to Year 8 trying to pitch an idea for a new climbing wall in our town. Paul enthusiastically agreed and the challenge was on for the students…

Never under-estimate the power of a good external speaker

DSCF1484

Paul came into school to give a presentation about the criteria he used to select a location for his business and stressed the over-riding importance of the financial numbers. This really helped the class to maintain a sense of proportion when it came to considering their options for converting the Mill. The first task was to fire up Digimap and identify the main buildings on the site. Then with kind permission of the current owners, the class donned hard hats and walked around the outside of the derelict buildings while making notes and taking photos.

Tonedale Mill buildings March 2014

DSCF1513

Back in the classroom the students annotated their digital maps of the site and designed surveys to test out the market for their ideas. Two hours of public research and data analysis followed, and the class began to put their ideas together as a PowerPoint in preparation for Paul’s return. At this point it was clear that they lacked crucial design skills and so we headed over to Simon Jones’s Slideshare account to pick up tips from the master. This had a transformative effect on the quality of everyone’s work.

Paul duly returned to the school and the students pitched their ideas. Here’s an example of the outcome…

The final presentations were a great success. Paul was so impressed with the class that he offered them a free taster climbing session at The Quay, (though some of them are already pretty good!)
cw

I have an idea that next year we’ll look at a project that will map and record the collective local memories of the Tonedale site.

Edited 18/5/14
Reason: Quoting Chris Durbin accurately. Adding extra media.

Apr 082014
 
Two boys surviving winter in Norway in a small wooden hut

Connor (Year 9)

NorthoftheSun

I first came across this extraordinary independent film at the 2014 Banff Mountain film festival. It’s won countless prizes and awards and deserves to be seen by as wide an audience as possible. It’s downloadable at Vimeo on demand from this link. The teaser pretty much sums up the plot line…

I was curious to see how the film would be received by students of different ages and took the opportunity of an enforced absence to set it as cover. I set three simple tasks to complete after watching:

1) Where’s the geography? (Why do you think you are being shown this film?)

2) What questions do you have after watching it?

3) Sum up the film in a sentence

Collating the key words from the responses to the first question highlighted interesting variations in the way the film spoke to different year groups. Despite evidence to the contrary, Year 7  have not done any work on recycling, although the landscape project is still fairly recent in their collective memories and we did make reference to Svalbard at the start of the year. It does look as though they’ve been exposed to a degree of “greenwashing” (though hopefully not in my lessons.) Year 8 on the other hand, did weather last term, and clearly thought that the film was being shown for that reason. Year 9 have just finished a unit of work on development which included a reference to Bhutan’s slogan “Gross National Happiness is more important than GNP”  so I was very happy to see several students reflecting on the film’s references to quality of life vs standard of living.

Year 7

7nots

Year 8
8nots

Year 9

9nots

Responses to the second question were perhaps more predictable, with many students asking somewhat disappointingly what the two characters were trying to “achieve”. It’s quite telling that few students seem to be able to conceive of outdoor adventure and fun being an end in itself. Encouragingly, several wanted to know where the beach was located, which is slightly more encouraging and would make a good piece of detective work. (I found it in about 15 minutes on Google Earth)  More interesting was the student from year 8 who wondered if they could have managed without mobiles and a supermarket.

As a potential offering for the four word film review site, Ellie from Year 7 managed to be the most concise with…

“Surfing til dawn”

and Kathleen from Year 9 offered…

A truly amazing winter

nots

I’m certain that there’s a great deal of potential learning to extract from this wonderful film. Despite the prevailing orthodoxy, occasionally there is a strong argument to be had for not splitting films into bite sized chunks, and instead just give students the chance to be captivated. Whether the theme is landscapes as part of a “fantastic places” – type unit, the impact of latitude on weather and seasons,  a comparison place study, or extreme tourism at GCSE, the film has a lot to offer. I suspect it could be a good precursor for introducing the John Muir Award into a school.

If you do discover the location of the beach – do keep it a secret. I might even see you there next summer!

North of the Sun on Vimeo

 

Mar 082014
 

It’s been a number of years since I was indoctrinated by Professor Hans Rosling to no longer refer to LEDCs and MEDCs when referring to the development status of a country. Here’s why…

The AQA GCSE syllabus A requires that students are familiar with the correlation and analysis of development indicators and of course the Gapminder website is a crucial teaching aid. Students have to be mindful of the dangers of using a single statistical measure of development and aware that countries have different development priorities and  perceptions of quality of life. I devised the following activity as a group work task to sum up this aspect of the syllabus.

Five groups were established and the activity introduced via the first slide of the presentation embedded below. (Needs to be downloaded from Slideshare to work as intended)

Each individual was given a table of 2012 development statistics and a commentary. The examples were carefully chosen to represent nations with very different development priorities. Each group was tasked with creating a rank order of the countries based on the statistics, the commentary and their own opinions.

Once the initial task was complete, the groups passed their rankings clockwise around the room, spending a couple of minutes perusing and commenting on each others thoughts. Once the circuit had been completed, each group had to construct a final ranking, taking into account the all the information and their newly acquired understanding of development priorities.

As part of ensuring that everyone was fully involved, certain students were randomly selected to describe and justify their final rank order. Much debate took place, though there was 100% agreement in terms of the top and bottom placed countries. Conveniently, since they all chose Norway as the most developed nation, I was able to introduce the Human Development Index data for 2013 which confirms their finding and illustrates the usefulness of this measure of development.

This is a nice little activity which requires very little planning and develops really interesting interaction between group members. Groups become accountable to each other and nobody can opt out of the final task. Originally it was intended as an “expert groups” activity and the passing on of their work was actually suggested by the students themselves. To my mind it fits nicely with Dylan William’s assertion that group goals and individual accountability can double the speed of learning.